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MICROCOSM, 1962 



6 



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2 




MICROCOSM STAFF 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
LITERARY EDITOR 
PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR 
ADVERTISING EDITOR 



Barbara Caneva 

Carolyn Fletcher 

Barbara Fair 

Margaret Ranstad 

Lynda Taylor 



TECHNICAL EDITOR 
CIRCULATION EDITORS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
ASSISTANTS 



Mary Ellen Chadwick 

Susan Harris 

Jane Cutler 

Carol Williams 

Sheila Hodge 

Louise Nash 

Susan Boyd 

Myrna Abbott 



ADVISORS 



Virginia Bratton 

Raymond Bosworth 

Dino Valz 






CHOOLS 




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ENIORS 






Dedication 



"Youth looks to the future, middle-age to the present, and old age to 
the past." As the senior class at Simmons, we are part of the past, pres- 
ent, and future of the College. We are the youth of today, but as seniors 
our undergraduate days are ending. We remember our defeats and tri- 
umphs, the traditions we followed and the new ones we created. Yet we 
are still active participants in the College community. We see the library 
building — no longer a dream, but a reality. Because we are part of the 
life of Simmons, we dedicate our yearbook to the College: the traditions 
of the past, the problems of the present, and the challenges of the future. 



DMNISTRATION 



President William E. Park 




There is a story told of the head of an American ed- 
ucational institution who is so busy with his many ad- 
ministrative duties that he has time each year to read 
only one book and that book is always the current year- 
book of his institution. While it is regrettable that his 
reading is so limited, I think that if his institution pro- 
duces as fine a yearbook each year as Simmons Col- 
lege he at least has some interesting and important 
reading. 

Certainly MICROCOSM is interesting and import- 
ant reading. Here in this book we have a record of 
another year in the history of Simmons College. But 
MICROCOSM is not simply the summary of an iso- 
lated year in the life of our College. It is, rather a con- 
necting link between the past and the future. For ex- 
ample, 1961-62 will always be remembered as the aca- 
demic year in which three important new buildings 
were dedicated: Beatley Library, Lefavour Hall, and 
Mesick Hall. These buildings have meant much to our 
College this year and will in the future, but they are 



also closely connected with the past. In naming them 
we honored three former leaders of our College, whose 
outstanding and devoted service will never be forgot- 
ten. Thus, in recording the events connected with these 
exciting additions to our College plant this year, MI- 
CROCOSM is also reminding us of the past and point- 
ing to a future made brighter by these developments. 

The real importance of MICROCOSM, however, 
lies in the fact that it presents a summary of the college 
years of the members of the Class of 1962. This book 
is a tribute to them and their contributions to Simmons 
as well as a record of their educational achievements. 
But here again, MICROCOSM is a real link between 
past and future, reminding us of the past activities of a 
fine class, but pointing to a new group of Alumnae who 
will add to the strength of Simmons College. 

This edition of MICROCOSM will not be my only 
reading this year, but it will certainly give me much 
pleasure. I express my thanks to the editors and all 
those who made this book possible. 



10 




Dean Eleanor Clifton 



For those of you who will become Alumnae of Sim- 
mons College in June, 1962, this MICROCOSM will 
always hold particular interest. It is intended as a record 
of one short period of your life in which you had the 
leisure to read many books, to think, and to grow. It 
is a mirror as well as a record, and its intent is to help 
you to review the route along which you have pro- 
gressed in the brief years of your undergraduate experi- 
ence. It is hoped that it will bring you pleasure in re- 
living some of the events that made up that experience. 
More than that, like the photographic record of our 
first astronaut's flight through outer space in 1962, it 
may give you clues, ideas, suggestions for your next 
"trip" or "orbit," in planning your progress toward 
fuller knowledge and wiser understanding. 

It is almost trite to mention the tremendous advance- 
ment of modern science and the gap it has created be- 
tween man's ability to work with matter as compared 



with his lack of knowledge of how to live and work 
with man himself. Yet, "education," currently the most 
popular word in our language, implies the responsibil- 
ity of each of us to concentrate on lessening that dis- 
tance between man as a person and man as a pure sci- 
entist or researcher. Lessening that gap has been a Sim- 
mons goal for sixty years. Tangible evidence of prog- 
ress toward that end is the Beatley Library, new this 
year. Simmons Alumnae took a great part in making 
that Library a reality. As you become an Alumna, you 
will find yourself a member of a group which never 
ceases in its effort to uphold Simmons standards. Our 
congratulations and wishes for your success and happi- 
ness as a member of that group are real and sincere. In 
the next sixty-year period you will add intelligence, 
strength, and dignity to life everywhere through your 
own good living. 



11 



Administration 




HELEN HEARTZ HERZOG 
Assistant to the Dean 



JANE ELLEN CURTIN 
Director of Admission 




J. GARTON NEEDHAM 

Vice-President and Dean of Instruction 




12 




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PRISCILLA McKEE 
Assistant to the Director of Placement 




WYLIE SYPHER 

Dean of the Graduate Division and Chairman of the 

Division of Language, Literature and the Arts 



ANN MOORE HANSON 
Director of Placement 




13 




DONALD B. HARTER 

Director of the Office of Development 




BERNICE J. POUTAS 

Director of Alumnae Affairs 




W. EASTMAN STEERE, JR. 
Business Manager 



RICHMOND K. BACHELDER 

Treasurer and Comptroller 




14 




EUGENE ACHESON 
Superintendent of Maintenance 



f 






MADELINE L. CARTWRIGHT 

Director of Students, Residence Halls 




YVONNE BROADCORENS 
Director of Publicity 

MARGARET V. FAIRCHILD 

Manager of Residence and Executive Dietitian 




15 



CHOOLS 



School of 

Business 

Administration 




WOODROW W. BALDWIN 

Director of the School of Business Administration 




Since its beginnings, the School of 
Business Administration has continually 
expanded to cover the changing needs of 
the business profession. Today's gradu- 
ate has a wide scope of job opportuni- 
ties in advertising, personnel, office or 
medical administration, bilingual secre- 
tarial work, or accounting. Each student 
has been able to combine liberal arts and 
professional training to meet the chal- 
lenges of today's business world. 



TILLY S. DICKINSON 

Associate Professor of Secretarial Studies 



18 





MARGARET ANN McKENNA 
Assistant Professor of Secretarial Studies 



EDWIN F. MORAN, JR. 
Instructor in Secretarial Studies 



Seniors in Office Procedures class. 




19 




HAROLD HODGKINSON 

Former Director of the School of Education 



School of Education 



The youngest and one of the most popular Schools provides teaching proficiency 
in English, Languages, History and Social Studies, Science and Mathematics. In 
1956 the growing demands for an educational program at Simmons led to the birth 
of the School of Education. Philosophies of education, methods and practical appli- 
cation combine with authoritative knowledge of subject, to qualify graduating stu- 
dents as teachers throughout the country. 

Present demand for graduates is simple expression of the School's success. 



20 



In their senior year, students in the School of 
Education teach for one semester 




21 




Sch 



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Home Economics 



MARGARET ROSS 

Director of the School of Home Economics 



During the past fifty years, home eco- 
nomics has become an established pro- 
fession. As a result, the School of Home 
Economics has continually widened its 
objectives. Since its founding, the School 
has shifted its teaching emphasis from 
skills to principles, converted Pilgrim 
House into a home for cooperative living, 
and added a nursery school. The physical 
change and growth of the School has 
been great, but necessary in order to keep 
up with a widening field. 




Eight weeks are spent in Pilgrim House 

as a part of the course in Home Management 



22 




ELIZABETH PATTERSON 

Assistant Professor of Foods and Nutrition 



LUCY FISHER 

Associate Professor of Foods 





DIANA ABBOTT 

Lecturer on Nutrition 



23 



School of Library Science 




KENNETH SHAFFER 

Director of the School of Library Science, 
with H. J. Aschenborn of the State 
Library of the Republic of South Africa. 



During the past sixty years the School of Library Science has gained the reputa- 
tion of graduating students of high practical caliber, sensible to the problems of a 
changing profession. Now that Beatley Library and Lefavour Hall have expanded 
its teaching facilities, the School will be able to continue to serve the demands for 
graduates with high professional potential and leadership. 



24 




JOHN BERRY 
Reference Librarian 



The improved facilities of Beatley 

Library augment the excellent program 

in the School of Library Science. 





25 



Prince 
School 
of 
Retailing 



There will be changes at Prince next 
year: it will become part of the School 
of Business Administration, and move 
from 49 Commonwealth Avenue to 300 
The Fenway. The courses will remain 
the same, offering highly specialized 
training in the field of retailing and fash- 
ion. 

Prince has a unique field work pro- 
gram in the senior year, in which the stu- 
dents teach in the training courses of 
commercial stores. 

The annual fashion show is a highlight 
of the students' four years at Prince. 
They write, produce, and model in the 
show. 

When the girls end their training, they 
are ready to meet the need and demands 
of the world of fashion. 



JESSIE MILDRED STUART 
Professor of Retailing 




26 




No 



w 



BARBARA HALEY 

Acting Director of Prince, and 
Associate Professor of Retailing 



Then 




27 



School of 
Publication 



VIRGINIA BRATTON 

Assistant Professor of Graphic Arts, and 

Director of the Simmons College Press 




Depression demands for specialization 
in 1933 transformed the School of Eng- 
lish to the future School of Publication. 
Under the direction of the late Robert M. 
Gay, students combined English studies 
with journalism and book publishing 
courses. In 1951 the program officially 
became the School of Publication — one 
of the first of its kind. Additional courses 
in industrial magazines, children's litera- 
ture, writing courses, and graphic design 
have been added. 

Simmons College Press, the newest ad- 
dition to the School, is a product of ex- 
pansion to the fifth floor of Beatley Li- 
brary. 




RAYMOND F. BOSWORTH 
Director of the School of Publication 
and Professor of English 




DINO VALZ 

Lecturer on Book and Magazine Publishing 



28 




DONALD FESSENDEN 
Lecturer on Journalism 




ALDEN W. POOLE 

Special Instructor in Journalism 




DOROTHY F. WILLIAMS 

Associate Professor of Publishing, and 

Managing Editor of THE SIMMONS REVIEW 




29 




School 

of 

Nursing 



The School of Nursing is a five-year 
course which offers two years affiliation 
with leading Boston hospitals. A girl 
graduates from this School with both a 
bachelor's degree and a Diploma in 
Nursing. Students receive knowledge of 
practical training and theory. They gain 
experience in nursing, teaching, and ad- 
ministration. 

In answer to the need for further 
training, the School of Nursing offers 
courses to registered nurses who want a 
more complete education. Nursing stu- 
dents are a part of two worlds — that of 
the Campus and that of the hospital. 
They are true examples of the success- 
ful combination of arts and sciences. 



During the last two years of the program, 
student nurses work in leading Boston 
hospitals 



30 



JEAN HOUSTON 
Associate Professor of Nursing 



ursi* 




L. ANN CONLEY 
Director of the School of Nursing 




Fourth year nurses. 




31 



School of 
Science 



The School of Science offers the stu- 
dent the opportunity to explore the fields 
of biology, physics, chemistry, orthoptics, 
physical therapy, medical technology, or 
mathematics. It has a flexible program 
which changes readily to meet the needs 
of a rapidly changing society. By speciali- 
zation in one field during her last two 
years, the student is well qualified to meet 
job opportunities or to go on for a higher 
degree. 

Lab and class work are extensive, and 
the Simmons student who graduates 
from the School of Science is one of the 
ablest entering her chosen field. 




JOHN A. TIMM 

Director of the School of Science 





DAVID SHEPRO 

Associate Professor of Biology 



ALLEN D. BLISS 
Professor of Chemistry 



32 





PHILIP M. RICHARDSON 

Professor of Biology 



FRANK DeSUA 

Professor of Mathematics 





JOSEPH T. LEVERICH 

Instructor in Mathematics 



33 




CARROLL MILES 

Director of the School of Social Science 



School of Social Science 



The School of Social Science, 
one of the youngest schools at 
Simmons, offers four basic pro- 
grams — p u b 1 i c administration, 
economic analysis, community 
work, and psychological measure- 
ments. Using one of these as a 
foundation, a girl gets a broad 
general education, and because 
she has the opportunity to partici- 
pate in volunteer work, field trips, 
or spend a semester in Washing- 
ton, she gains experience directly 
in her field. 



HENRY HALKO 

Assistant Professor of History 




34 




JOHN HUNTER 

Assistant Professor of History 



PAUL NICHOLS 
Associate Professor of Economics 




ROY TOLLEFSON 
Associate Professor of Government 




35 



Department of 




MANFRED KLEIN 
Associate Professor of German 





EDWARD ADDELSON 

Assistant Professor of French 



LAWRENCE LANGER 
Assistant Professor of English 



Literature, Languages . . . 





EDITH F. HELMAN 
Professor of Spanish 



KENNETH GREENE 
Associate Professor of English 




JAMES NEWMAN 
Associate Professor of French 



37 



and the Arts 



Mlfi 1 * 



BURTON A. CLEAVES 
Director of Musical Activities 



s0&jL 





LYLE BUSH 

Associate Professor of Art 



Physical Education 



MARGARET ROWE 
Associate Professor of Physical Education 



38 





Division of 

Philosophy and 

Psychology 



STEPHEN DEANE 
Chairman of the Division of Philosophy and Psychology 




FREDERICK ANDERSON 

Assistant Professor of Philosophy 




HELEN M. JONES 

Associate Professor 
of Psychology 



CTIVITIES 



Student Government 



STUDENT GOVERNMENT 




Carol Simonovitz, Robin Miller, Janet Gilman, Cynthia Crane. Elinor Lowe, Janet DeVylder, 
Roberta Zimmerman, Barbara Wolff 



Student Government Council seeks to give the student a chance to express her- 
self as a vital part of the college community. It means various things to the various 
groups with which it deals. 

To the student, Stu-G is the means of access to the Administration and Faculty 
as a whole, and the channel through which to work questions and suggestions for the 
improvement of the College. 

To the Faculty and Administration, Stu-G is the closest approximation of that 
hypothetical being, the Simmons Student. The Council and the Association officers 
represent the student body in the eyes of the officials of the College. It is their means 
of including the student in the inner workings of the school. 

To a member, Stu-G Council is a part of education — the part in which she learns 
the fascinating, challenging and often devious ways of political action within a so- 
ciety. 



42 



Organizations 



HONOR BOARD 

Honor Board is the judiciary 
branch of Student Government. 
Its primary responsibility is to 
educate the student body to the 
Honor System. 

The Honor System, a valued 
tradition at Simmons, is based on 
the ideal of individual integrity 
and responsibility. The Board 
functions to develop this spirit in 
the students. 




Nancy Carpano, Cindy Crane. Ann Van Nest, Linda Hill, Sherry Collins, Francis Downes, 
Elaine Innamorati 



43 



Class Officers 



The class officers represent the com- 
bined interests of all their classmates. 
They help to coordinate and crystalize 
the hopes and suggestions of all the girls 
in their class, providing a link between 
student opinion, and the faculty and ad- 
ministration. 



SENIOR CLASS 




Jane Conway. Joan Conlin, Joan Brittan. Dorri Rizzo, 
Teris Weinberger. 



Wilma Swett, Claire Tevekelian, Roberta Pritzker, Barbara 
Sooper. Joan Bentley, Jane Frohock, Barbara Kane, 
Ruth Hodess. 



44 




JUNIOR 
CLASS 



Judy Zelig, Sue Hermann, Harriet Elam, Virginia Belyea. 
Marjorie Israel, Sue Kelfer, Sue Greening. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Karen Davis, Pam Wilson, Julynn Wong. 




45 




EVANS HALL 

Jessie Moulton, Kathleen Rizzo, Rhoda Singer, 

Sylvia Jaakkola, Judy Friedman 




Dorm Officers 




HASTINGS HOUSE 

Cynthia Nelson, Gertrude Brown, 

Patricia Mais 



MORSE HALL 

Mary Ellen Chadwick, Mrs. Silver, 
Sue Howard, Ros Lowenstein 



46 



MESICK HALL 

Mrs. Coyne, Janice Topor, Bess Hansor, 

Carol Nobel, Ellen Halprin, Ann Webster, 

Nancy Vines 



ARNOLD HALL 

Rose Jacobson, Connie Carey, Mrs. Philbrick, 

Julie King, Sue Murphy, Jane Frohock 







SOUTH HALL 

Diane Torto, Betty Hageman, Mrs. Sayward, 

Martha Bianco, Virginia Hines 



NORTH HALL 

Doreen Mahoney, Mrs. Pattison. 
Maryann Sturner, Pat Marrow, 
Arlene Greenbaum 




LONGWOOD HOUSE 

Carol Sarno, Patricia Goodwin. Marjorie Lanz 



DIX HALL 

Barbara Cope. Mrs. Lash, Dorothy Russman, 

Peggy Loeb, Ros Ossen, Nancy Solander 




SIMMONS HALL 

Sally Dayton. Doris Hershfield, Mrs. Chandler, Jane Moskowitz. 
Carol Hershon, Marcia Forman, Patricia Bourne, Madalene Wiebel, 
Barbara Heilbrunn, Myrna Pollack, Sue Mendelsohn 




48 




MICROCOSM 

Lynda Taylor, Jane Cutler, Barbara Caneva, 
Sue Harris, Louise Nash, Carol Williams, 
Peggy Ranstad 



Simmons Publications 

Although MICROCOSM and NEWS no longer share the same crowded offices, 
they still share ideas, frustration, and typewriters. While NEWS works to publish 
interesting and effective material every week, MIC works all year to put together the 
year's record of student events, the yearbook. Their responsibility is great, as they 
plan a memento of Simmons that their fellow students will have forever. 



NEWS 



Barbara Firgir, Lori Weiss, 

Lynn Aston, Debby 

Hurwitz, Roz Lowenstein, 

Vicki Nazarian 





FAD 

Mary Pat Drake, Ruth Pritsker, Joyce 

Ambrose, Judy Freedman 



NSA, Forum and FAD, each in its 
own way, share the function of promot- 
ing student awareness at Simmons. NSA 
is the overt result and expression of a 
cooperative student movement based on 
cognizance. As it effects the student, it 
is both a service and a political organ- 
ization. Forum's programs help to bring 
the ideas of NSA and of leading thinkers 
to the campus through a series of lectures 
and forums in the fields of politics, cur- 
rent events, philosophy, and the arts. 
FAD (Films, Arts, and Discussions) pro- 
vides and stimulates cultural activities on 
campus. The focus is on creative talent 
and individual interests with opportunities 
to participate in artistic endeavors and 
discussion groups. 

The functions of FAD and Forum will 
be combined next year into SCOPE (Stu- 
dent Committee on Programed Events). 
SCOPE will continue to work closely 
with NSA in programing public affairs 
and the arts. 




NSA 

Carol Lurie, Barbara Wolff, Sue Greening, 

Joyce Ambrose, Lynne Berman 



FORUM 

Marcia Chase, Laurie Taylor, Judy Weinstock, 
Jean Gunn, Carol Lurie, Ruth Tamaroff, Mameve 
Stern, Elaine Innamorati 




50 



Organizations 





RECREATION ASSOCIATION 

Patricia Yule, Ellie Gladding, 

Pam McKissock, Sally Flowers 



SOCIAL ACTIVITIES 

Sally Smith, Carol Simonovitz, Ellie Gladding, 

Donna Gordon, Claire Tevekelian, Roberta Pritzker, 

Nathy Levin 





SOCIAL RELATIONS 

Betsy Preston, Nancy Tseng. 

Roberta Pritzker, lanet Weinberger 



DRAMA SOCIETY 

Marcia Chase, Gail Bensman, 

lanet Greene, Sue Goodfriend, Helen Tobak 



*-^v- ' 



51 



House Presidents' Council 



House Presidents' Council is presided over by the 
First Vice-president of Student Government, and is 
comprised of the dormitory presidents, Campus Social 
Activities Chairman, the Campus fire chief, amd the 
secretary. The President of Student Government, the 
Second Vice-president, and the Chairman of Honor 
Board are members ex-officio. 

Standing committees of the Council investigate areas 
on Campus where improvements are needed. The com- 
mittees vary in scope of activity. During the past year, 
committees concentrated their efforts on Bartol Hall, 
the possibility of erecting a sundeck on Campus and a 
bulletin board for offering or desiring jobs, progress ar- 
ticles for the NEWS, integrating commuters, and estab- 
lishing a liaison with the Graduate House. 

Because House Presidents' Council functions pri- 
marily as a discussion group, Campus affairs are han- 
dled as a whole by Student Government. The Coun- 
cil and Stu-G do work together in areas which overlap. 

House Presidents' Council also serves as an appeal 
board for dorm board decisions which a student feels 
are unjust. 




Informal but 
efficient. 




We aim for the 
advancement of 
student welfare 
on campus. 



52 




Modern Dance 



Edna Fisher, Gwen Wharton, Barbara Coon 



Glee Club 




53 




Bluette. 



Rehearsals are often informal but the results are polished. 



Public relations number one for the surrounding male 

colleges. 

Pure enjoyment for the entire Simmons community. 

Rhythmic blends of harmony and tone. 

Individual arrangements. 

Boil it down to beat. 

The Bluettes. 




Santa's helpers welcome "Santa Baby" in person. 




Give me note that will really swing. 



54 



s 



wimmons 





Perfect timing and precision 



In or out of the pool we have grace. 

Swimmons and Swimmonettes glide through the waters of Brook- 
line Pool. The Synchronized Swim Pool presents its annual Spring 
Show. "Nutcracker Fantasy" unfolds its dream world to a capacity 
crowd. 

The Club, which began when we were freshmen, provides prac- 
tice swimming and endurance, as well as individual choreography, 
costuming, and lighting for the annual show. 



Mermaids are no longer a myth. 





Ring-around-the-rosy. 



55 




ts»» '•-'•'.fj. 

> * « 



HILLEL 

Judy Smith, Barbara Fair, Rena Resnick, Cecile Leinwand 



Religious Clubs 



Religious clubs have always been part of the wide range of inter- 
ests of Simmons students. Every girl has the opportunity to partici- 
pate in the religious activities of her choice. At times, the different 
religious groups hold joint programs so that their members may gain 
new knowledge of other religions. Through religious and social ac- 
tivities, these clubs try to broaden our knowledge and interests. 



56 



NEWMAN CLUB 

Pat Plummer, Mary Pat Murnane, 

Maureen O'Rourke 





IVCF 

Ann Fairbairn, Carol Tonsing. 

Judy Boice 



57 




FRENCH CLUB 

Nancy Cohen, Marjorie Haynes, 
Rena Resnick, Michele Bagda- 



HOME ECONOMICS CLUB 
Sally Dayton, Carol Childs, Martha 
Pease, Mary Birdsall, Nancy Tseng 




58 



Academy and Honors Convocation 




ACADEMY 

Teris Weinberger, Ann 

Webster, Sally Dayton, 

Diana Frye, Frances Downes. 

Elinor Lowe, Linda 

Poole 



Honors Convocation, begun in the fall of 1959 as 
an annual event to recognize academic achievement, 
was held in Alumnae Hall on November 8, 1961. 
Eight juniors and seniors received awards, and seven 
seniors were admitted to Academy. 

The seven girls inducted into Academy are the first 
to become members under the new standards — an 
accumulative 3.5 average for 96 semester hours, with 
not lower than a 3.12 average for the semester prior 



to admission. 

Academy functions primarily as an honorary or- 
ganization, and claims only a chairman and a secre- 
tary. 

Regarding the jump from over fifty to less than 
ten members in Academy as a result of the new 
standards, Academy's advisor, Wylie Sypher, observed 
that the results, while perhaps not democratic, were 
instantaneous! 



HONORS CONVOCATION 

President Park, Janice Topor, 

Ann Webster, Carolyn Fletcher, 

Sally Dayton, Carol Brokvist, 

Marion Haugaard, Barbara 

McGaw, Judith Levine 




59 



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Beatley Library - Lefavour Ha 
were dedicated 
October 4, 1962 




John Volpe. 

Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 



"How many minds yet unborn 

will be enriched in this building." 

Bernhard A uer. 




Bernhard Auer, 
Publisher, Time, Inc. 




62 




The Pageant begins. 




Queen Janet DeVylder and King Elinor Lowe. 



Perhaps in days of old 
when knights were bold, 
(or so we're told), 
halls were cold . . . 
and drafty, peasants unruly, 
and minstrels unhappy. 

But at the Simmons Court, 
there's warmth, good cheer, and sport, 
and jesters foolishly cavort 
while royalty mourn the lack of port . . . 
and even Sergeant Friday gets 
a dragon with a dragon-net. 

The dragon is undone, 
there's no place to run. 
We sadly see that fun 
and play games and laughter's done . . . 
and all and we have left is an apple core 
from the boar's head. 



Olde English 
Dinner 




The court jesters provided merry 
entertainment. 



Olde English Dinner as enjoyed by past classes of 

Simmons College. 




63 




4 



Always the masters, or shall we say 
mistresses, of ceremonies! 



Song Fest 



What's in a name? Maybe a note, 
a bar, a stanza, a harmony, a tune, in 
fact, a song. 

What's in a song? Lots of enthusiasm, a 
little ham, but mostly just fun. 

Where is a song? Maybe anywhere, 
but on one day, a special day in the fall, 



there's a song in Alumnae Hall. 

But not just one song. Many songs, 
hundreds of songs (maybe we exaggerate) 
are lifted up (songs are always "lifted") 
in unison. 

This is Song Fest 1961-1962. 



Nothing or no one escaped in 
our satire in song. 




64 



Skit Night 



The Lights are dimmed 
For a night of fun 
Simmons skit night 
Has just begun. 

For weeks and weeks 
Scripts have been planned 
Some were accepted 
Some were banned. 

Talent is ready 
The stage is set 
Everyone anticipates 
A fine event. 

Dorms are competing 
Amid laughter and sighs 
As for the annual trophy 
Each group tries. 




Skits from our past 



Soph-Senior night had the glory of the orient. 



PI1 1 ' I 'PflHHHHHH 





We got along without men ... on skit night. 




65 




Front doors are decorated for inter-dorm competition. 



Winter 
Weekends 





Snowmen appeared all over campus. 



Christmas Cotillion. 




Winter Weekends bring jazz concerts, 
informal dancing, and theater parties, 
Cotillion, and brunches. On Sunday af- 
ternoon Bartol Hall rings with mascu- 
line voices. And when all the fun ends, 
we look forward to our long-dreamed-of 
Christmas vacation! 



'Let's twist again!" 



Sitting out a dance at Cotillion. 



• . <>. ■ - 



-f — jrjj^^H 




67 




May 
Breakfast 



May Breakfast our Sophomore year: King 
Marjorie Burroughs feeds Queen Grace 
Richardson, '60. 



6 a.m. — Strawberry Breakfast time! In 
the dorms buzzers sound, baskets clatter, 
and shrieking voices penetrate every cin- 
der block. Irate freshmen and juniors, 
knowing protest is hopeless, bury their 
heads under pillows. 

No begging, cajoling, or hiding by the 
seniors can prevent the sophomores from 
completing their appointed rounds. After 
all, opportunity doesn't knock three 
times. Only twice in four years can we 
stand bleary-eyed in line at Bartol Hall 
at 6:30 a.m.; only twice can we get all 
the strawberries, bananas, and whipped 
cream we want. 





A past view of May Breakfast, begun 
in 1912. 



68 




From game playing . . . 



Spring Spree 



When spring has sprung, 
Spring Spree is sprung on 
the whole campus. Every- 
body wants to let loose and 
have fun in spring — so why 
not do it together? 

From hot dog eating to 
water-sponging, from game 
playing to Dr. Shepro's 
auction, from seeing our 
favorite professor in a wild 
sport shirt to meeting his 
wife and children — this is 
Spring Spree. 




to meeting the wives of professors 
and President Park . . . 



\ffi-. 



to Dr. Shepro's auction. 
This is Spring Spree! 




69 



300 The Fenway 




Preview of Simmons. 



Dodging the pigeons at 300 The Fen- 
way, racing for the elevator which is just 
leaving, gulping the much-needed cup 
of coffee in the Caf, cramming at the last 
minute for the exam that makes or breaks 
you, all are part of our education. 

The impossible Contemp exams, the 
long English papers, the discovery in 
Chem Lab which was already discovered 
centuries ago, the crowded Caf with not 
enough seats, the fabulous records in the 
Listening Room, the good and bad mo- 
ments that make college worthwhile, they 
shaped us as we shaped them. 

No more will we race from the fifth 
floor of the Library to the third floor of 
the Main Building, or sheepishly return 
overdue books, or overdraw our accounts 
at the Comptroller's Office. 




"Stick-'em up! 




"That'll be $52.65." 




Last minute cramming. 




"What did I do now- - -?" 




"Anything from the grill, girls?" 





'. 






'^^*hU 


X^Br^-r^' '''I* / 


m 3Jfc!U!* 


■ 




^iMTr 


W*'* m^M 


*'i L 


f"'*? 'jTTZM 




*L i!n£ 




BTHk t iSKk 


WT^r'iL 


Fi 





Relaxing in the Caf between (and during!) classes. 




A busy day in the Faculty Lounge. 



the faculty lounge. 




71 




Around the world with John Glenn. 




". . . It's about those fraternity punches!" 



Back-to-Bach 




Friendly persuasion. 




72 




Dr. Shepro is very popular with bio majors! 




Time-out between classes in the old 




. . . and new Lounges. 



"It's about your hour exams, girls . . ." 





Are you smoking more now 





"That book is out this week.' 



Which Dean's List did I make this semester?!" 



True Confessions. 




74 




"Yes, Santa, there is a Virginia 



Juniors in the School of Pub get revenge. 





Tweedle-dee and Tweedle-dum. 



Going home. 




75 



Around the Dorms 




«,*«* 



'Good afternoon, Arnold Hall." 



s * 




"No, I'm not busy Saturday." 



Can you ever forget the meals at Bartol, the 
six-thirty a.m. fire drills, the "underwater" walks 
across the Fenway? These are a part of us. Then 
there was Olde English Dinner and the pig, May 
Breakfast and the six o'clock rise-and-shine, Co- 
tillion, and the snow drifts! 

Campus has its Pinkerton men, and locked 
gates when you are just a little late. It has blaring 
phonographs and giggling girls. It has dorm board, 
and Bridge games through the night, and busy 
phones. It has the one-thirty race across the lawn, 
and the eight-thirty drag to that first hour. 

Campus life is different — a never-again-time 
which will always be a well-remembered part of 
college life. 




"How do you spell his name?" 



"Are you free 

for the next 

three weekends?" 




76 




Food for thought. 




'Five more minutes till Ben Casey! 




Friday afternoon teas in the dorms 



have become a tradition. 




77 








"Two hour exams tomorrow!" 



'You get my milk, I'll get the silver.' 



The Peppermint Twist. 




"What can I do next to procrastinate?!" 




78 





"We are the girls from good ole' Simmons C. 



"Sandwiches and milk.' 




'Just one more hand!" 



"This shorthand looks like Greek." 




• • 






79 




A little more cheesecake, please. 




Never on Sundae. 



Always on Tuesday. 



""* 


igf§gft£ 


™* 1 


flr^fil 






| J I I' 


■%m 1 



80 





"Why didn't you tell me Arnold Hall 
doesn't have a chimney? !" 



Dream on, dream on, Teenage Queens. 

.-■■.■■•■■. ...... .: f j : ,.v. ' ■ ■■ ',■■:■ 




; 'So you were my Angel Sister!" 




"Isn't there anything in 
here besides newspaper?" 



81 





I A >* 







While the House Mother is away 



'Skiing conditions weren't too good! 





Practicing up for the weekend. 



Pilgrim's Progress. 



82 




Anthony Wedgewood Benn was 
received enthusiastically. 



and then he gave me his pin!" 





Memories are made of this. 



83 




Sears: Simmons' North Star. 



v • ' 




Boston — the city of prune-faced old 
ladies and black umbrellas, the home of 
Filene's Basement and the Copley 
Square pigeons. Boston — where you can 
eat at Joe and Nemo's or Lock-ober's. 
This is the city where the girls go. From 
Beacon Hill to the Charlesgate, from 
Back Bay to Brookline, from MIT to 
Harvard, old and new, these haunts are 
ours. 

Think of walking down the Hill in the 
pouring rain, trying to cross streets in 
spite of red-faced, yelling policemen, 
think of piles of snow smothering the 
city, and daffodils in the Garden. All 
these are Boston. 

Remember the soap-box speakers on 
the Common, the organ grinder on New- 
bury Street, the rush hours on the sub- 
way, the strolls along the Charles. There 
are old dowagers walking their poodles 
on Marlborough Street, there are young 
beatniks airing their beards on Charles 
Street. Everywhere there is an air of the 
old city filled with the young. 



One of Howie's better days 



The "Winsor" school for girls. 




84 



I 



'Boston 
is Your 
Campus" 




"Wonder if I got my weekends mixed up?" 




To the State House for a Government paper. 



Diet tomorrow! 




85 




Bargain hunting. 




Buying course books in Harvard Square. 



"Now just fall in.' 




86 




"Dump the oranges! 
Here comes Ness!" 




One of the better institutes of technology. 



Bermuda: Bovs and a suntan! 




87 



ENIORS 



V- ■ 



t«-i 



v<* 




MYRNA SUSAN ABBOTT 
Education 




PRISCILLA SUE ARLEN 

Education 





MARGUERITE M. AHERN 
Home Economics 




LYNNE MARIE ASTON 
Publication 



MARIE MADELINE 
ARSENEAULT 

Home Economics 



90 





FAY BACHNER 

Science 



RUTH ELLEN BABCOCK 
Home Economics 




MARJORIE ANN BAKER 
Social Science 




BRENDA ANNE BAILEY 

Nursing 




BARBARA ANN BANKS 
Social Science 



91 




\ 



LAURIE JEAN BECKETT 
Science 





LYNNE MOSKOWITZ BERMAN 
Education 




JOAN MILLETT BENTLEY 

Education 




MARTHA ELEANOR BIANCO 

Social Science 



SARAH B. BERTOLET 

Science 



92 





ILENE BLOCK 
Social Science 



BRENDA WHITE BLAIR 

Nursing 





ELLEN RENA BLUMSACK 
Education 



CLARA JANE BOND 
Education 




IRENE BEVERLY BORG 

Science 



93 





SUSAN DEE BOYD 
Social Science 



CAROLE BREITMAN 
Social Science 





DORCAS RUTH BRIGGS 

Social Science 



JOAN SANDRA BRITTAN 
Business Administration 





MARGARET LOUISE BROCK 

Education 



GERTRUDE BROWN 

Social Science 



94 




BONNIE JEAN BULGER 
Publication 






MARJORIE ELLEN 

BURROUGHS 

Science 



GRETHEL CAMPS 
Business A dministration 



BARBARA JEAN CANEVA 
Publication 





CLAIRE MARIE CANTERA 
Science 



ELLEN JANE CANTY 
Social Science 



95 




NANCY VILDA CARPANO 
Science 





MARY ELLEN CHADWICK 
Publication 



LOIS ADRIANNE CHARLES 

Science 





SUSAN MULLEN CHAYET 
Social Science 



SHEILA JUDITH CHASEN 
Social Science 



96 




CAROL THOMPSON CHILDS 

Home Economics 




BARBARA EVELYN COHEN 

Social Science 




MARTHA ANN CLASBY 
Science 




DOROTHY MARGUERITE 

COCCAGNA 

Retailing 




SHARON MARIE COHEN 

Business Administration 



97 




LINDA ANN COHN 
Business A dministration 




JANE ELIZABETH CONWAY 
Education 





JOAN BEVERLY CONLIN 
Education 




BARBARA COPE 

Social Science 



NANCY ELIZABETH COOK 
Home Economics 



98 




CYNTHIA JOYCE CRANE 
Business Administration 




HELEN LOUISE DALELIO 

Nursing 




MERYL KATHERINE 
CRAWFORD 
Social Science 




JANE SYBIL CUTLER 

Social Science 




SARAH JANE DAYTON 
Home Economics 



99 





TOBY WALLACE DEITCH 

Science 



PANAGIOTA DEMETRIADES 

Home Economics 





MARY DERDERIAN 
Science 



JANET MARIE DEVYLDER 

Social Science 





FRANCES HARROD DOWNES 

Science 



MARY PATRICIA DRAKE 

Publication 



100 





BARBARA DOROTHY DUBINS 

Education 



SUSAN DUNLOP 
Social Science 





BEVERLY JANICE ENG 
Library Science 



BARBARA FAIR 

Publication 





ANN FAIRBAIRN 
Social Science 



SUSAN ANN FALK 
Retailing 



101 




BARBARA ANN FIRGER 

Publication 




NANCY CATHERINE 
FLAHERTY 

Library Science 





ELAINE FISHER 

Science 




SALLIE THERESA FLOWERS 

Social Science 



CAROLYN NANCY FLETCHER 
Publication 



102 




MARIE THERESE FOLEY 

Publication 




MARCIA SANDRA FORMAN 
Social Science 





JANET SALTZ FREEDMAN 
Library Science 



PEGGY ROSE FORMAN 
Science 




COLLEEN MAE FRENCH 

Education 



103 




JANE ELLEN FROHOCK 
Education 




CAROLE MARIE GANLEY 

Nursing 





DIANNA LOUISE FRYE 
Science 




MARY DAY GIBBS 

Publication 



GAIL OCTAVIA GEMELLI 

Publication 



104 




JANET CLAIRE GILMAN 
Business A dministration 




CYNTHIA ANNE GLASS 
Nursing 




SUSAN SPERRY GILMAN 
Social Science 




ELAINE DORIS GINESKY 

Nursing 




RUTH MARJORIE GOLDBLATT 

Education 



105 





PATRICIA GOODWIN 

Business A dministration 



BETTE JEAN GORDON 
Education 




KAREN LOUISE 
GRAVENGAARD 

Science 




BEVERLY ANN GRAY 
Social Science 




ARLENE THELMA 
GREENBAUM 

Science 




BARBARA MERLE GREENBERG 

Social Science 



106 





SARA BETH GREENE 
Social Science 



JOAN BARBARA GREENSTEIN 

B us in ess Admin is I ration 




ELEANOR FRANCES 
GROSSMAN 

Social Science 




ROBERTA FAYE GROSSMAN 
Science 





BARBARA ANNE GUEST 
Nursing 



CAMILLE MARGOT HARE 

Library Science 



107 




SUSAN HARRIS 
Social Science 




ESTA HENRY 
Business Administration 





SANDRA CLAIRE HELLINGER 

Social Science 







DORIS HERSHFIELD 

Education 



MYRNA FAYE HERSCOT 
Social Science 



108 




LINDA RUTH HILL 
Science 




BETTE ANN HOLLAND 
Nursing 




RUTH ANNE HODESS 
Education 




SHEILA ELLEN HODGE 
Social Science 




SACHIKO HONDA 

Social Science 



109 




JOAN ELIZABETH HUDSON 

Science 




PRISCILLA GLASS HUTCHINS 

Nursing 





DEBORAH SUE HURWITZ 

Science 




LINDA JOAN JAFFEE 
Science 



ROSE DUBBY JACOBSON 

Publication 



110 




SYBIL BRINA KALES 

Publication 




BARBARA SUSAN KENSLEY 
Publication 




BARBARA ANN KANE 
Business A dministration 




MARY ELIZABETH 
KELLIGREW 

Social Science 




ANN HULDAH KNIGHT 
Publication 



111 





THEODORA MAE KOBRENSKI 

Education 



MARCIA ELAINE KOMARIN 
Business Administration 





RUTH MARILYN KOTELL 
Science 



LOUISE LEVISON 

Social Science 





INA STEPHANIE LEWIS 
Education 



RUTH MURIEL LIBERFARB 

Science 



112 





ANN LOIS LOCKE 
Social Science 



ELAINE MARILYN LOCKE 
Social Science 





MARGARET ANN LOEB 

Publication 



JACQUELINE MAY LONG 
Nursing 





ELINOR LOWE 

Publication 



ROSALYN LOWENSTEIN 
Business Administration 



113 




MARGOT JEANNE LUDERS 
Social Science 




DOROTHY JEAN MAHONEY 
Home Economics 





PATRICIA ANN McEVOY 
Retailing 




ROBERTA JEAN MANTELL 
Education 



LOIS ANN MANDELSTAM 

Nursing 



114 




PATRICIA ELLEN MAYNARD 
Business A dministration 




ANTOINETTE HARRIET 
MILLER 

Home Economics 




ALVAH SUSAN MENDELSOHN 
Education 




NANCY BARBARA MICHELSON 
Publication 




JOYCE ROBIN MILLER 

Retailing 



115 





MYRNA EDITH MOCK 
Social Science 




ELLEN FRANCES MORSE 

Retailing 




ELAINE ELIZABETH MORAN 

Education 




SHEILA FRANCES MURPHY 
Nursing 



JOAN PHYLLIS MOSKOVITZ 

Education 



116 




HOPE STRUM MYERS 
Home Economics 




VICTORIA LUCY NAZARIAN 

Publication 




LOUISE CAROLYN NASH 
Business Administration 




JUDITH ANN NASSE 
Business Administration 




JOAN ALICE NELSON 
Retailing 



117 





MARY ELIZABETH NEWBOLD 
Social Science 



PHYLLIS ANN NICKERSON 
Nursing 





CAROL LOUISE NOBEL 
Social Science 



JEAN MARIE PAQUETTE 

Education 





NANCY BLIGH PEACOCK 

Social Science 



JANICE ETHEL PERRY 

Education 



118 





JOANNA PHILLIPS 
Business A dministration 



LINDA JOYCE POLLINGHER 

Science 





LINDA JEAN POOLE 
Science 



RUTH BARBARA PRITSKER 

Education 





ROBERTA PRITZKER 

Social Science 



PATRICIA ANNE RAFFERTY 
Social Science 



119 




MARGARET ANNE RANSTAD 
Social Science 




JUDITH IRENE RIDER 

Retailing 





CAROL LOUISE RHODY 

Nursing 




KATHLEEN FRANCES RIZZO 
Business Administration 



DORTHEA RAPHAEL RIZZO 

Social Science 



120 




LYNNE ROBINSON 
Social Science 




JUDITH LINDA SANDERS 
Library Science 




DOROTHY MAE RUSSMAN 
Science 




CAROL SHULMAN RUTBERG 
Education 




PHYLLIS BERKOWITZ SCHNUR 
Education 



121 




GLORIA JEAN SCOTT 
Nursing 





MARY ANN SHAPIRO 
Science 



' 



JOANNE MARIE SHEEHAN 

Education 





CATHERINE MAY SKELTON 
Home Economics 



CAROL JEAN SIMONOVITZ 
Nursing 



122 




CATHERINE LINN SLAGER 
Social Science 




NANCY GOODRICH SMITH 

Nursing 




JUDITH SMITH 

Education 




LORAINE FRANCES SMITH 

Social Science 




ANN TERESA SOLERA 
Science 



123 





BARBARA SILVIA SOOPER 

Education 



HELEN LOUISE SULLIVAN 
Science 





WILMA STEPHANIE SWETT 

Library Science 



JUDITH ANN SYMONS 
Science 





LYNDA ANN TAYLOR 
Social Science 



NINA SARAH TEITELBAUM 
Retailing 



124 




Jftfe 


WF% 





CLAIRE ANNE TEVEKELIAN 
Science 



CAROL ELLEN TONSING 

Publication 





JANICE GLORIA TOPOR 

Education 



DIANE JOSEPHINE TORTO 

Publication 




LAUREL BERNARDINE 

TROMBLEY 

Home Economics 




GAIL TRUST 

Retailing 



125 





ANN KATHRYN VAN NEST 
Education 




PHYLLIS ANNE VAUGHNN 
Social Science 



ANN ELIZABETH WEBSTER 
Science 





TERIS WEINBERGER 

Science 



JANET ILMA WEINBERGER 

Social Science 



126 




LORETTA ANN WEISS 
Education 




MADALENE MARIE WIEBEL 

Business A dministration 




HELEN FRANCES 
WERTHEIMER 

Social Science 




GLORIA MYRL WHITE 

Social Science 




CAROL DOROTHY WILLIAMS 

Business Administration 



127 




BARBARA ELLEN WOLFF 
Education 




MARGARET AILEEN YATES 
Home Economics 



MARGARET MARIE HENNIG 
Retailing 

GWEN TUCKER WHARTON 

Publication 




SANDRA RAE WYNER 

Education 




ROBERTA FAY ZIMMERMAN 
Education 



128 



"I have loved the stars too fondly 
To be fearful of the night." 

Sarah Williams 



Our senior year has been saddened by the 
death of Carol Thompson Childs. Her joy of 
living, her courage, and her spirit will be re- 
membered by us always. Our friendship and 
association with Carol have enriched our lives 
and given us strength to face our own problems 
with greater faith and courage. The inspiration 
Carol has given us will be one of life's greatest 
treasures. 



CAROL THOMPSON CHILDS 

December 2, 1940 — January 9, 1962 



129 



SENIOR DIRECTORY 



ABBOTT, Myrna — English Education; 110 Linden Avenue, 
West Long Branch, New Jersey. 



AHERN, Marguerite — Home Economics; 95 Twiss Road, 
North Chelmsford, Massachusetts. 



BIANCO, Martha Eleanor — Social Science; 598 White Plains 
Road, Eastchester, New York; News 1, 2, 3; House Counselor 
4; Fire Captain 3. 

BLAIR, Brenda White — Nursing; East Woodstock, Connect- 
icut; Ann Strong Club 2, 3, 4; Floor Rep. 3. 



ARLEN, Priscilla Sue — Education; 82 Holbrooke Road, White 
Plains, New York; Campus Guide 2; Transfer Welcome 2; 
Steering Committee Junior Welcome 3; Co-chairman F.A.D. 
2; Co-chairman Fund Drive 3; F.A.D. 2; Vice-president Dorm 
3; Dorm Rep. 4. 

ARSENEAULT, Marie M. — Home Economics; 12 Brodeur 
Avenue, Webster, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4. 



BLUMSACK, Ellen Rena — Education; 41 Whitney Road, Med- 
ford, Massachusetts; Sock'n Buskin 1, 2; F.A.D. 2, 3, 4; 
House Counselor 3; French Club 2, 3, 4; Hillel 1, 2. 

BOND, Clara Jane — Education; 9 Crandall Street, Adams, 
Massachusetts. 

BORG, Irene Beverly — Science; 36 Oaktree Road, Dedham, 
Massachusetts. 



ASTON. Lynne Marie — Publication; 21 Glenwood Road, Al- 
bany 4, New York; Simmons News 1, 2, 3, Editor 4; Inter- 
national Relations Association 3. 



BABCOCK, Ruth Ellen— Home Economics; 29 Hartford 
Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts; Home Ec. Club 2, 3, 4; 
Campus Guide 2. 

BACHNER, Fay— Science; 1 Strathmore Road, Brookline, 
Massachusetts; Class Song Leader 2; Class Vice-president 3; 
Glee Club President 4. 



BAILEY, Brenda Anne — Nursing; Exeter Road, Hampton 
Falls, New Hampshire; Ann Strong Club 2, 3, 4; A. A. 3; 
Swim Club 1, 2, 3. 

BAKER, Marjorie Ann — Social Science; Amity Road, Bethany, 
Connecticut; Dorm Social Activities Chairman 2; Dorm Secre- 
tary-Treasurer 3. 



BANKS. Barbara Ann — Social Science; 255 North Street, Man- 
chester, New Hampshire; Co-chairman of Publicity, Spring 
Spree 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Co-chairman Olde English 
Dinner 4. 

BECKETT, Laura Jean— Science; R.F.D. # 1, Ellsworth, Maine. 

BENTLY, Joan Millett — Education; Apartment 4, 28 Irving 
Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Honor Representative 2, 3; 
Forum Representative 4. 



BOYD, Susan Dee— Social Science; 4280 S.W. 78 Avenue, 
Portland 25, Oregon; Assistant Fire Captain 1; Junior Wel- 
come 3; MIC Staff 4: Dean's List 3. 

BREITMAN, Carole Iris — Social Science; 6 Fairway Drive, 
White Plains, New York. 

BRIGGS, Dorcas Ruth— Socio/ Science; 1 Blake Street, Hart- 
land, Maine; A. A. Rep. from Dorm 1; Outing Club 1; Canter- 
bury 1, 2, 3, 4; Officer 2, 3, 4. 

BRITTAN, Joan Sandra — Business; 80 Hudson Street, Milton, 
Massachusetts; Secretary of Class 4; School of Business 3; 
Hillel 1, 2; Chairman of Publicity Christmas Weekend 3; 
Junior Welcome 3; News 2, 3; Co-chairman of Publicity 
Hillel 3. 

BROCK, Margaret Louise — Education; 4 Watertown Street, 
Lexington, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Glee Club 
1; Commuter Organization. 

BROWN, Gertrude Alice — Social Science; 1423 Fairlee Drive, 
Fairfax, Virginia; Student Assistant 4. 

BULGER, Bonnie ].— Publication; 160 Wetherill Road, Gar- 
den City, Long Island, New York. 

BURROUGHS, Majorie Ellen— Science; 152 Aspinwall Ave- 
nue, Brookline, Massachusetts; Rep to Social Activities 1; 
Class President 2; Entertainment Chairman of Spring Spree 2. 

CAMPS, Grethel — Business; 1106 Calizto Garcia, Guantanamo, 
Cuba; Newman Club 1, 2; French Club 1, 2. 



BERMAN, Lynne Moskowitz — Education; 1002 Sharpless 
Road, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; NSA 3, 4; Young Demo- 
crats 3, 4. 



BERTOLET, Sarah Elizabeth— Science; 541 High Rock Street, 
Needham, Massachusetts. 



CANEVA, Barbara Jean — Publication; Old Church Lane, 
Pound Ridge, New York; Simmons News 1, 2; Junior Welcome 
3; Editor MIC 4. 

CANTERA, Claire Marie — Science; 6 Netherlands Road, 
Brookline, Massachusetts; Soph Rep to Bio Seminar 2; Glee 
Club 2, 4. 



130 



CANTY, Ellen Jane — Social Science; 29 Beacon Street, Ar- 
lington, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Outing Club 
4; Co-chairman of Volunteers Workers 2. 

CARPANO, Nancy V. — Science; R.F.D. #1, Rumford, Maine; 
Simmons College Orchestra 2; Honor Board Rep. 4. 

CHADWICK, Mary Ellen— Publication; U.S.V.A. Center, 
Hot Springs, South Dakota; Simmons News 1, 2, 3, 4; Gold 
Key Award; MIC Staff 4; Campus Guide 2; NSA Jr. Delegate 
3; President IRA 3; Student Assistant 4. 



COPE, Barbara — Social Science; 80 William Street, Portland, 
Maine. 

CRANE, Cynthia Joyce — Business; 51 Sholes Avenue, Nor- 
wich, Connecticut; Synchronized Swim Club 1, 2; Stu-G 
Office Staff 1; Co-chairman Sophomore Luncheon 2; Campus 
Guide 2; A. A. Rep. from Class 3; A. A. Rep. from Dorm 2; 
House Counselor 3; Honor Board Chairman 4. 

CRAWFORD, Meryl K. — Social Science; Highland Farm, 
East Wolfboro, New Hampshire. 



CHARLES, Lois Adrianne — Social Science; 8 Westmore 
Road, Mattapan, Massachusetts; Chairman of Volunteer Work- 
ers 3, 4; Rep of School of Social Science 3; Outing Club 3. 

CHASEN, Sheila Judith— Social Science; 20 Brandeis Road, 

Newton, Massachusetts. 

CHAYET, Susan Jane — Social Science; 19 Everett Street, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome 3. 

CHILDS, Carol Thompson — Home Economics; 112 Lawrence 
Park Terrace, Bronxville, New York; Spring Spree Booth 
Committee 1; Floor Rep. 2; Campus Guide 2; Home Ec. 
Club 2; Secretary 3; National Home Economics College Clubs, 
State Secretary 4. 

CLASBY, Martha Ann — Science; 175 Walnut Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts. 

COCCAGNA, Dorothy M. — Prince; 105 Runnymede Avenue, 
Wayne, Pennsylvania; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; F.A.D. 2, 3, 4; Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; Morse 
Hall Treasurer 4; Transfer Welcome Committee 3. 

COHEN, Barbara Evelyn — Social Science; 64 Ormond Street, 
Mattapan, Massachusetts; Outing Club 2; House Counselor 3; 
Transfer Welcome 3; Stu-G Office Staff 1; Campus Guide 2; 
Hillel 1; Social Relations Volunteer 2. 

COHEN, Sharon Marie — Business; 38 Lowell Road, Winthrop, 
Massachusetts. 

COHN, Linda Ann — Business; 3344 Greenway Road, Shaker 
Heights, Ohio; Secretary of French Club 2; Secretary-Treas- 
urer of Social Activities 4. 



CUTLER, Jane Sybil — Social Science; 75 Glendale Road. 
Ouincy 69, Massachusetts; A. A. Rep. from Class 2; Co- 
circulation Manager MIC 4. 

D'ALELIO, Helen Louise — Nursing; 46 Quimby Street, Water- 
town, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Ann Strong Club 
2,3. 

DAYTON, Sally — Home Economics; Church Street, Alexan- 
der, New York; Home Ec. Club 3, 4; President 4; Student As- 
sistant 4; Academy 4. 

DEITCH, Toby Ann Wallace— Science; 85 Strathmore Road, 
Brighton, Massachusetts; Co-chairman of Freshman Picnic 
1; Hillel Representative 1. 

DEMETRIADES, Panagiota Palaiologou — Home Economics; 
85 Greenbrier Street, Dorchester, Massachusetts; Home Ec. 
Club. 



DERDERIAN, Mary — Science; 55 Arlington Street, Metheun, 
Massachusetts. 



DEVYLDER, Janet— Social Science; 1355 Milldale Road, 
Cheshire, Connecticut; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Treasurer 2; 
President 3; Physical Therapy Club 2; Sophomore Workshop 
2; House Counselor 3; Student Government First Vice-presi- 
dent 4. 



DOWNES, Frances — Science; 44 Briggs Street, Melrose, 
Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus Guide 2; 
Junior Welcome Committee 3; Honor Board Secretary 4. 



CONLIN, Joan Beverly — Education; 58 Webster Road, Milton, 
Massachusetts; News 2, 3; Junior Welcome 3; Newman Club 
1, 2, 3, 4; Class President 4; Stu-G. 



DRAKE, Mary Patricia — Publication: 5845 Fairfax Avenue, 
Edina, Minnesota; F.A.D. 3, 4; Spring Spree Booth co-chair- 
man 3; Transfer Welcome Chairman 4; Secretary of Morse 
Hall 4. 



CONWAY, Jane Elizabeth — Education; 30 Wachusetts Road, 
Needham, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2; Junior Welcome 
Assistant Chairman 3; Junior Prom Chairman 3; Vice-presi- 
dent Senior Class 4. 



DUBINS, Barbara — Education; 460 Lowell Avenue, Newton, 
Massachusetts; News 1, 2, 3, 4; Managing Editor 4; F.A.D. 
2, 3; Junior Welcome Committee 3. 



COOK, Nancy Elizabeth — Home Economics; 284 High Street, 
Medford, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Campus 
Guide 2. 



DUNLOP, Susan — Social Science; 54 Massachusetts Avenue, 
Worcester, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 4; Transfer Wel- 
come Committee 4; Floor Representative, Morse 4. 



131 



ENG, Beverly Janice — Library Science; 26 Longfellow Road, 
Arlington, Massachusetts. 

FAIR. Barbara — Publication; 54 Longfellow Road, Newton, 
Massachusetts; Freshman Rep., Dix; Interfaith Council 2; 
Hillel Treasurer 3; Vice-president 4; F.A.D. 4; MIC 4. 

FAIRBAIRN, Ann — Social Science; 27 Marcia Road, Water- 
town, Massachusetts; Orchestra 2, 3, 4; I.V.C.F. 3, 4. 

FALK, Susan — Retailing; 641 Ramapo Avenue, Pompton 
Lakes, New Jersey; Hillel 1, 2; Outing Club 1; Sock'nBuskin 
1; News 1, 2; Stu-G Office Staff 1; Dean's List 1; Skit Night 
Chairman 2; Prince School Rep. 3; lunior Welcome Commit- 
tee 3; Prince Club 2, 3, 4; F.A.D. 2, 3, 4. 

FIRGER, Barbara — Publication; 9 Arlington Street, Newton, 
Massachusetts; Glee Club 1; Sock'nBuskin 1, 2; News 2, 3; 
Technical Editor 4. 

FISHER, Elaine — Science; 52 Locust Street, Winthrop, Mass- 
achusetts; Campus Guide 2; Spring Spree Booth Chairman 
2, 3; Junior Welcome 3. 

FLAHERTY, Nancy — Library Science; 1315 5th Avenue 
North, Fort Dodge, Iowa. 

FLETCHER, Carolyn— Publication; 1436 Massachusetts 
Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts; Datebook Editor 3; Com- 
muter Club 3; MIC 4. 

FLOWERS, Sallie— Social Science; 240 Harvard Circle, New- 
ton, Massachusetts; Floor Rep., Dix 3; Glee Club 3, 4; 
Athletic Rep. Morse 4. 

FOLEY, Marie — Publication; 9 Regan Road, Dorchester, 
Massachusetts; Commuter Club 3; Chairman on Stu-G 4; 
Newman Club 3, 4; Sock'nBuskin 4. 

FORMAN, Marcia — Social Science; 467 Cornwall Street, 
Hartford, Connecticut; Student Assistant, Simmons Hall 4. 

FORMAN, Peggy — Science; 33 Oakridge Road, West Orange, 
New Jersey; Glee Club 1, 2; Class Treasurer 2; Bluettes 3, 4; 
Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4. 

FREEDMAN, Janet — Library Science; 68 Puritan Lane, 

Swampscott, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Transfer Wel- 
come Committee 3; Social Activities Chairman 3. 

FRENCH, Colleen— Education; 57 Whiting Street, Dedham, 
Massachusetts; Glee Club 2, 3, 4; Song Leader 3; Junior 
Welcome 3. 

FROHOCK, Jane— Education; 45 Rhode Island Avenue, 
South Portland, Maine; Glee Club 1; Bluettes 2, 3, 4; Leader 
3, 4; House Counselor, Evans 3; Student Assistant Arnold 4. 

FRYE, Diana — Science; Abbot Hill, Wilton, New Hampshire; 
Orchestra 2, 3, 4; Academy 4. 



GANLEY, Carole — Nursing; 159 Park Road, Hamden, Con- 
necticut; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Anne Strong Club 2, 3; 
Treasurer 4; Junior Welcome Committee 3. 

GEMELLI, Gail — Publication; Main Street, Norwell, Mas- 
achusetts. 

GIBBS, Mary Day — Publication: 41 Worcester Street, Taunton, 
Massachusetts; Glee Club 1, 2; Secretary-treasurer 3; Manager 
4; News 1, 2, 3, 4; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; IVCF 1, 2; Campus 
Guide 2; Assembly Series 3, 4. 

OILMAN, Janet — Business Administration; 6 Parker Street, 
Maiden. Massachusetts; Freshman Rep., Vice-president, North 
Hall 2; Secretary, Stu-G 4. 

GILMAN, Susan Sperry — Social Science; 1144 Main Street, 
Leicester, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Floor Rep., 
Arnold 3; Dean's List 1. 

GINESKY, Elaine — Nursing; 584 Newton Street, Chestnut 
Hill, Massachusetts; Hillel 1 ; Social Activities Chairman 2; 
Vice-president 3; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4. 

GLASS, Cynthia — Nursing; Chambers Road, Taunton, Mas- 
sachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4. 

GOLDBLATT, Ruth— Education; 53 Bay State Road, Holy- 
oke, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome Committee 3: Young 
Democrats 3, 4; News 3, 4. 

GOODWIN. Patricia — Business Administration; 189 Wash- 
ington Road, Rye, New York; House Counselor 3; Student 
Assistant 4. 

GORDON, Bette Jean— Education; 193 Strawberry Hill Ave- 
nue, Stamford, Connecticut; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Welcome 
Committee 3; Fund Drive 3. 



GRAVENGAARD, Karen Louise- 
Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio. 



-Science; 700 Wakefield 



GRAY, Beverly — Social Science; 119 Freeman Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; Commuter Rep. 1; Business School Rep. 
2; Commuter Rep., Stu-G 3. 

GREENBERG, Barbara— Social Science; 200 East 57th Street, 
New York, New York. 

GREENBAUM, Arlene — Science; 139 Payson Avenue, New 
York, New York; Fire Captain, North 2; House Counselor, 
North 4; Physical Therapy Club, Vice-president 4. 

GREENE, Sara Beth— Social Science; 315 East 70th Street, 
New York, New York; Class Rep. to the Executive Board 2; 
Assembly Series 2, 3; Treasurer, Arnold 3; Woodrow Wilson 
Fellowship; Graduated October, 1961. 

GREENSTEIN, Joan — Business Administration; 49 Lorraine 
Avenue, Providence, Rhode Island; Fund Drive 2; Junior 
Welcome Committee 3; Spring Spree 3. 



132 



GROSSMAN, Eleanor — Social Science; 95 Byfield Street, 
Providence, Rhode Island; News 1, 2; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4. 

GROSSMAN, Roberta — Science; 139 Willow Street, West Rox- 
bury, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome Committee 3; Spring 
Spree, Co-Treasurer 3. 

GUEST, Barbara Anne — Nursing; Stony Brook Road South, 
Darien, Connecticut; MIC Staff 4. 

HARE, Camille — Library Science; 35 Onondaga Street, Rye, 
New York; Secretary, North 4. 



HURWITZ, Deborah— Science; 11 Greenleaf Circle, Lynn, 
Massachusetts; News 1, Circulation Manager 2, 3, 4; Hillel 

1, 2, 3, 4; Junior Welcome Committee 3. 

HUTCHINS, Pricilla Glass — Nursing; 29 Grover Street, Wal- 
pole, Massachusetts; Stu-G Rep. 1; Christian Association 1, 

2, 3; Commuter Association 3; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4. 

JACOBSON, Rose— Publication; 4829 Chevy Chase Boule- 
vard, Chevy Chase, Maryland; Executive Board 2; Publication 
Rep.; F.A.D. 2, 3. 4; House Counselor, Arnold 3; House Presi- 
dent, Arnold 4. 



HARRIS, Susan — Social Science; 7 Hickory Lane. Northbrook, 
Illinois; Riding Chairman 2, 3, 4; NSA Treasurer 3, 4; Stu-G 
Workshop 4; MIC Co-circulation Manager 4. 



JAFFE, Linda — Science; 109 Morningside Road, Worcester, 
Massachusetts; Freshman Rep.; Campus Guide 2; Outing Club 
2, President 3, 4; Floor Rep. 3 Junior Welcome Committee 3. 



HELLINGER, Sandra— Social Science; 27 Upham Road, 
Lynn, Massachusetts; Freshman Office Staff 1; Campus Guide 2; 
Transfer Welcome Committee 2; Social Relations 3, 4. 



KALES, Sybil— Publication; 60 Greycliff Road, Brighton, 
Massachusetts; News 1, 2; Campus Guide 2; Hillel 2, 3; 
Treasurer, Morse 3; Co-editor Datebook 3; Assembly Series 4. 



HENNIG, Margaret — Retailing; 483 Northern Parkway, 
Ridgewood, New Jersey; A.A. 1, 2; Christian Association 
1, 2; Glee Club 1, 2, 3; House Counselor 3. 



KANE, Barbara — Business Administration; 59 Archer Street, 
Fall River, Massachusetts; Executive Board, Business School 
Rep. 4. 



HENRY, Esta — Business; 71 Beal Street, Winthrop, Massa- 
chusetts; Spring Spree 1 ; Winter Cotillion 2; Commuter Social 
Activities Rep. 3; Co-chairman Christmas Dance 3. 



KELLIGREW, Mary — Social Science; 40 Grant Avenue, Glens 
Falls, New York; Social Activities 1; Stu-G 2, 3; Class Presi- 
dent 3; Washington Semester 4. 



HERSCOT, Myrna V.—Social Science; 3 Washington Park- 
way, Lowell, Massachusetts. 

HERSHFIELD, Doris — Education; 117 Perry Avenue, Law- 
rence, Massachusetts; Dean's List 2, 3; F.A.D. 2, 3, 4; Social 
Relations, President 3; House Counselor 4. 

HILL, Linda — Science; 1 Maple Avenue, Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts; Ring Chairman 2; Junior Welcome Committee Chair- 
man 3; Honor Board Rep. 4. 

HODESS, Ruth — Education; 8 Boulevard Terrace, Brighton, 
Massachusetts; News 1, 2; Junior Welcome Committee 3; 
Student Government Rep. 4; Commuter Organization Ex- 
ecutive Board 4; Class Executive Board 4. 

HODGE, Sheila — Social Science; 313 Wheeler Avenue, Scran- 
ton, Pennsylvania; Sophomore Workshop 2; Junior Welcome 
Committee 3; MIC Staff 4. 

HOLLAND, Bette Ann — Nursing; 531 East Broad Street, 
Westfield, New Jersey; Freshman Rep. Council 1; Nursing 
Rep. to Executive Board 2; Social Chairman, Evans 2; Syn- 
chronized Swim Club 1, 2, President 3, 4; Social Activities 
Chairman, Campus 3; Junior Welcome Committee 3. 

HONDA, Sachiko— Social Science; G 620 Deerfield Drive, 
Seabrook, New Jersey; Campus Guide 2; Floor Rep., South 
2,3. 



KENSLEY, Barbara — Publication; 33 Oakland Street, Lexing- 
ton, Massachusetts; News 2; Bluettes 3, 4; Floor Rep., Morse 
3; Spring Spree 3; Placement Commission Rep. 3; Transfer 
Welcome Committee 3; House Counselor, Morse 4. 

KNIGHT, Ann— Publication; North Windsor Street, South 
Royalton, Vermont; Secretary, South 3; Spring Spree Co- 
chairman 3; Christian Association 3; Handbook Staff 3. 

KOBRENSKI, Theodora — Education; 71 Basswood Street, 
Lawrence, Massachusetts; Honor Board 1, 2. 

KOMARIN, Marcia — Business Administration; 18 Columbia 
Park, Haverhill, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; Student Invitation 
Day 2. 

KOTELL, Ruth Marilyn— Science; 221 School Street, Somer- 
ville, Massachusetts. 

LEVISON, Louise — Social Science; 3505 Bayard Drive, Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio; Glee Club 1, 2; Sock'nBuskin 1, 2; Hillel 1, 2, 4; 

News 3, 4. 

LEWIS, Ina Stephanie — Education; 4625 5th Avenue, Pitts- 
burgh, Pennsylvania. 

LIBERFARB, Ruth— Science; 25 Alwin Street, Hyde Park, 
Massachusetts; News 1; Campus Guide 2; Sophomore Lunch- 
eon 2; Junior Welcome 3; Commuter Organization 3; Hillel 

3, 4. 



HUDSON, Joan Elizabeth — Science; 6 Michael Street, Arling- 
ton, Massachusetts. 



LOCKE, Ann — Social Science; 54 Heard Street, Chelsea, 
Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2; Campus Guide 2. 



133 



LOCKE, Elaine — Social Science; 54 Heard Street, Chelsea, 
Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2, 3; Campus Guide 2; Young Demo- 
crats 3. 



MOCK, Myrna Edith— Social Science; 107 South 2nd Street, 
Jeannette. Pennsylvania; Campus Guide 2; House Counselor, 
Dix3. 



LOEB. Margaret — Publication; 930 Summit Avenue, Westfield, 
New Jersey; Executive Board 1; Glee Club 1; Spring Spree 1, 2; 
Bluettes 2, 3, 4; House President 4. 



MORAN, Elaine Elizabeth — Education; 2648 Massachusetts 
Avenue. Lexington, Massachusetts; Commuter Chairman of 
Spring Spree 3; Newman Club 1, 2. 3, 4. 



LONG, Jacqueline — Nursing; 289 Tremont Street. Braintree, 
Massachusetts; Secretary, Evans 2; Spring Spree 2; Anne 
Strong Club 2, 3, 4. 

LOWE. Elinor — Publication; All Margaret Street, Herkimer, 
New York; Glee Club 1; Bluettes 2, 3, 4; Stu-G 3; Stu-G 
President 4; Academy 4. 

LOWENSTEIN, Rosalyn — Business; 70 Criket Lane, West 
Roxbury, Massachusetts; Transfer Welcome 3; Vice-president 
Morse 3; House Counselor. Morse 4; News Business Manager 4. 



MORSE. Ellen Frances — Retailing; 50 South Main Street, 
Northfield, Vermont; Newman Club 1. 2, 3. 4; Booth Chair- 
man 1; Communion Breakfast Co-chairman 3; Campus Guide 
2; Floor Rep. 2, 3; Stu-G Assistant Treasurer 3; Student 
Assistant 4; President of Prince Club 4. 

MOSKOVITZ. Joan Phyllis— Education; 74 Stearns Road, 
Brookline, Massachusetts; Class Secretary 1; Freshman Office 
Staff 1; Transfer Welcome Committee 2; Junior Welcome 
Publicity Chairman 3. 



LUDERS. Margot — Social Science; 14 Rustic Lane, Green 
Farms, Connecticut; Modern Dance Club 1, 2, 3, 4; Sophomore 
Luncheon 2: Floor Rep. Arnold 2. 

McEVOY, Patricia — Retailing; 16 Myles Standish Road, West 
Roxbury, Massachusetts; Junior Welcome Committee 3; Prince 
Club 4. 

MAHONEY, Dorothy — Home Economics; 3 Old Mamaroneck 
Road, White Plains, New York; Assistant Fire Captain 2; 
Dorm Secretary 2; House Counselor, North 3; House Presi- 
dent 4. 

MANDELSTAM, Lois — Nursing; 70 Lincoln Road, Hyannis, 
Massachusetts. 

MANTELL, Roberta Jean — Education; 45 Belgrade Terrace, 
West Orange, New Jersey; Stu-G 1; Class Vice-president 2; 
Forum 3; F.A.D. 4. 

MAYNARD, Patricia Ellen — Business; West Street, Plants- 
ville, Connecticut; Newman Club 1, 2, 3. 4; Dorm Board 4; 
Dorm Secretary 4. 

MENDELSOHN, A. Susan — Education; 21 Pine Hill Road, 
Swampscott, Massachusetts; Hillel Publicity Co-chairman 3; 
Spring Spree Ticket Co-chairman 3; Assistant Volunteers 
Chairman 3; Floor Rep. 3; House Counselor 4. 

MICHELSON, Nancy Barbara — Publication; 5 Annapolis, 
West Newton, Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2, 3. 

MILLER, Antoinette H. — Home Economics; 15 French Ter- 
race, Watertown, Massachusetts; Home Ec. Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Home Ec. Rep. to Class 3, 4; Co-chairman Home Ec. Banquet 4. 



MURPHY, Sheila Frances — Nursing; 330 Reservoir Road, 
Chesnut Hill 67, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Anne Strong Club. 



MYERS, Hope Strum — Home Economics; 63 Ashton Road, 
Yonkers, New York; News Circulation Staff 1, 3; Sophomore 
Executive Board; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Publicity Chairman 3; 
Entertainment Chairman of Sophomore Luncheon 2. 



NASH. Louise C. — Business; 535 Rosewood Lane, Harrisburg, 
Pennsylvania; MIC Staff 4; Secretary to House President's 
Council 4. 



NASSE, Judith Ann— Business; 1240 Eastford Road, 
bridge. Massachusetts; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4. 



South- 



NAZARIAN, Victoria L. — Publication; 5 Stearns Road, 
Watertown, Massachusetts; News, Copy Editor 3, 4. 

NELSON, Joan Alice— Retailing; 2 Rowe Hill Road, Stone- 
ham, Massachusetts; Outing Club 2, 3; Simmons News 2, 3; 
Junior Welcome 3; Prince Club 2, 3, 4. 



NEWBOLD, Mary Elizabeth — Social Science; Lowell Road, 
Concord, Massachusetts. 



NICKERSON, Phyllis Ann— Nursing; 367 West Emerson 
Street, Melrose 76, Massachusetts; Anne Strong Club 1, 2, 3, 
4; Refreshment Chairman 2; Vice-president 3; Assistant Fire 
Captain, Evans 2; Campus Guide 2; Class Nursing Rep. 3; 
Junior Welcome Committee 3; Song Leader Longwood 3; 
Winter Week-end invitations Chairman 3. 



MILLER, Joyce Robin — Retailing; 1017 Glenwood Boulevard, 
Schenectady, New York; Stu-G Office Staff 1; News 1; Sopho- 
more Executive Board 2; Campus Guide 2; Class Blazers 
2; Freshman Sophomore Prom 2; Treasurer of Prince Club 
3; Junior Welcome 3; Stu-G Treasurer 4. 



NOBEL, Carol Louise — Social Science; 212 Barth Avenue, 
Pittsburgh 28, Pennsylvania; Freshman Executive Board Rep. 
1; NSA Rep. to Conference 1; Campus Guide 2; Dorm 
Officer 2; Co-chairman of Song Fest 2; Stu-G Rep. 3; Junior 
Welcome Committee 3; House Counselor 4. 



134 



PAQUETTE, Jean Marie — Education; 21 Dix Street, Wal- 
tham, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3; Outing Club 1; 
News 2, 3; Dorm Floor Rep. 3; Junior Welcome 3. 



RIZZO, Kathleen F. — Business; 78 Grandview Avenue, Wal- 
lingford, Connecticut; Newman Club 1, 2; Junior Welcome 
3; Floor Rep, Evans 3; House Counselor 4. 



PEACOCK, Nancy Bligh — Social Science; 32 High Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut; Dorm Rep. 1; Minstrel Leader for 
Olde English Dinner 1, 2, 3; Orchestra 2, 3, 4. 



PERRY, Janice Ethel — Education; 15 Old Meadow Road, 
West Hartford, Connecticut; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; F.A.D. 2, 3, 
Co-chairman 4. 



ROBINSON, Lynne — Social Science; 31 Washington Parkway, 
Lowell, Massachusetts. 



RUSSMAN, Dorothy Mae — Science; 54 Wolcott Street, Med- 
ford, Massachusetts; House Counselor, Dix 4. 

RUTBERG, Carol S.— Education: 82 Jersey Street, Boston, 
Massachusetts. 



PHILLIPS, Joanna — Business; 451 Lynnfield Street, Lynn, 
Massachusetts; IVCF 1; Outing Club 1. 



SANDERS, Judith Linda — Library Science; 53 Morse Street, 
Hamden, Connecticut. 



POLLINGHER, Linda J.— Science; 27 Almont Street, Matta- 
pan, 26 Massachusetts; Freshman Office Staff 1; News 1; 
Hillel 1; Campus Guide 2; Fund Drive Co-chairman 3; School 
of Science Rep. 3. 

POOLE, Linda Jean — Science; 50 Casco Road, Lynn, Massa- 
chusetts; Freshman Office Staff 1; IVFC 1, 2; News Reporter 
1,2; Technical Staff News 3, 4; Academy 4. 

PRITSKER, Ruth Barbara— Education; 102 Overhill Road, 
Providence, Rhode Island; Skit Night Chairman, Morse 2; 
Door Decoration Chairman, Morse 2; House Counselor, Sim- 
mons 3; F.A.D. 2, Publicity Chairman 3, Chairman 4. 



PRITZKER, Roberta— Social Science; 1672 Chapel Street, 
New Haven, Connecticut; Outing Club 2. 3; News 2, 3; Social 
Relations Publicity Chairman 2, 3, Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4; 
Junior Welcome Party Chairman 3; Dorm Rep. to Social 
Activities 4. 



RAFFERTY, Patricia Anne— Social Science; 111 Vinton 
Street, Melrose, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2; Outing 
Club 1. 



SCHNUR, Phyllis Berkowitz— Education; 19 Everett Street, 
Cambridge, Massachusetts. 

SCOTT, Gloria Jean — Nursing; 173 West Broad Street, Paw- 
catuck, Connecticut; Anne Strong Club 2, 3, 4; Campus 
Guide 2; House Counselor 3; Senior Executive Board 4. 



SHAPIRO, Mary Ann — Science; 151 Rumson Road, Atlanta, 
Georgia; Hillel 1, 2, 3; Synchronized Swim Club 1, 2, Vice- 
president 3; Physical Therapy Club 2, 3, 4. 

SHEEHAN, Joanne Marie — Education; 1367 Commonwealth 
Avenue, Brighton, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1. 2, 3, 4; 
Campus Guide 2; Junior Welcome 3. 

SIMONOVITZ, Carol Joan— Nursing; 120 Robin Road, West 
Hartford, Connecticut; Co-chairman of Sophomore Luncheon 
2; Campus Guide 2; Strawberry Breakfast 2; Social Activities 
Rep. 2, 3; Co-chairman of Christmas Weekend 3; Social 
Activities Chairman 4. 

SKELTON. Catherine May — Home Economics: 11 Sears 
Street. Burlington, Massachusetts: Home Ec. Club. 



RANSTAD, Margaret Anne — Social Science; 4231 Alton 
Place, Washington 16, D. C; MIC 4. 



SLAGER, Catherine — Social Science; News 1; Junior Wel- 
come 3; Transfer Welcome 4. 



RHODY, Carol Louise— Nursing; G. F. Keefer, 253 Hollow 
Tree Ridge Road, Darien, Connecticut; Anne Strong Club, 
Publicity Chairman 2, President 3, Communicator 4; Junior 
Welcome Committee (Steering) 3; Transfer Welcome Com- 
mittee 4. 



SMITH, Judith — Education; 70 Sampson Parkway, Pittsfield, 
Massachusetts; Hillel 1, 2, 3, 4; Cultural Chairman 2, 3; 
President of Hillel 4; Dorm Skit Night Chairman, Simmons 
2; Fund Drive 2; International Relations Club 3; Young 
Democrats 3; MIC 3. 



RIDER, Judith Irene — Retailing; 1 Park Street, Wareham, 
Massachusetts; News Circulation 1, 2, 3, 4; A. A. Rep., Long- 
wood 1; Junior Welcome 3; Vice-president South Hall 3. 



RIZZO, Dorothea Raphael — Social Science; 157 Princeton 
Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts; Newman Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
Fund Drive 2; Commencement Hostess 3; Class Treasurer 4; 
Business Manager of Prom 4; Business Manager of Senior 
Week 4. 



SMITH. Lorraine Frances — Social Science; 49 Gardner Street. 
Arlington, Massachusetts; Newman Club; Freshman Prom 
Chairman. 

SMITH, Nancy G. — Nursing; 42 Flagler Avenue, Chesire, 
Connecticut; Synchronized Swim Club 1, 2, Secretary-Treas- 
urer 3, 4; Campus Guide 2; Co-chairman of Spring Spree 
Raffle 2; Floor Rep., Dix 2; Committee on Academic Activities 
2, 3; House Counselor, Hastings 3; Anne Strong Club Program 
Chairman 2. 



135 



SOLERA, Ann Teresa — Science; 57 Chickering Street, Pitts- 
field, Massachusetts; Swim Club 2, 3; Newman Club Vice- 
president 3; Physical Therapy Club Vice-president 3, President 
4; Fire Captain, Arnold 4. 



SOOPER, Barbara Silvia — Education; 93 Audubon Road, 
Milton, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Education Rep. to 
Class 3; Chairman of Junior Class Student-Faculty Coffee 
Hour; Junior Welcome 3; Education Rep. to Class Executive 
Board 4. 



VAN NEST, Ann K. — Education; 159 Park Street, Montclair, 
New Jersey; Honor Board Rep 4; House Counselor 3; Floor 
Rep 2; Freshman Rep 1; Campus Guide 2; Dean's List 2, 3. 

VAUGHAN, Phyllis Anne— Social Science; 16 Plymouth 
Drive, Scarsdale, New York; Canterbury-Trinity Church 2, 3, 4. 

WEBSTER, Ann Elizabeth— Science; 60 South Pleasant Street, 
Randolph, Massachusetts; Simmons Swim Club 1, 2, 3, 4; 
House President, Simmons Hall 3; House Counselor, Mesick 4. 



SULLIVAN, Helen Louise— Science; 16 Marian Street, Bur- 
lington, Vermont; Dorm Social Activities Chairman 2. 



WEINBERGER, Janet lima— Social Science; 110 Princeton 
Road, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; French Club 
1, 2; Social Relations Committee 3, 4, Secretary-Treasurer 4. 



SWETT, Wilma S. — Library Science; 81 Sheffield Road, New- 
tonville, Massachusetts; Hillel 1; F.A.D. Publicity Chairman 
2. Co-chairman 2; Library Assistant 2, 3; Library Science 
Rep. to Executive Board 4. 



WEINBERGER, Teris— Science; 51 Leland Road, Chestnut 
Hill, Massachusetts; Commuter Social Activities Rep. and 
Co-chairman of Cotillion 2; Class Secretary 3; Rep. from 
School of Science to Class 4; Academy 4. 



SYMONS, Judith Ann — Science; 3571 Main Road, Tiverton, 
Rhode Island; Glee Club 1, 2, Librarian 3, Student Director 4; 
Song Leader, Morse 3. 

TAYLOR, Lynda Ann — Social Science; 89 Collingsworth 
Drive, Rochester, New York; A. A. Rep., Arnold 1; Junior 
Welcome Committee 3; Fire Captain Arnold 3; MIC Staff 4. 



TEITELBAUM. 
Pennsylvania. 



Nina — Retailing; 300 Leila Street, Johnstown, 



TEVEKELIAN, Claire Anne— Social Science; 57 Bencliffe 
Circle, Auburndale, Massachusetts; Glee Club 2; Fund Drive 
Co-chairman 2; Class Treasurer 3; Social Activities Commuter 
Rep. 4; Bluettes 4. 



TONSING, Carol Ellen- 
Weymouth, Massachusetts: 
national Relations 3. 4. 



-Publication; 140 Belmont Street, 
1VCF 1, 2, 3, President 4; Inter- 



WEISS. Loretta Ann — Education; 61 Babcock Street, Brook- 
line, Massachusetts; Forum Rep. 1, 2; News 3, Managing 
Editor 4; House Counselor 3. 

WERTHEIMER. Helen— Social Science; 971 Oak Drive, 
Glencoe, Illinois. 

WHARTON, Gwendolyn Tucker — Publication; 39 Hutchings 
Street, Roxbury, Massachusetts 

WHITE, Gloria M. — Social Science; Bedford Road, Carlisle, 
Massachusetts; Outing Club 1, 2, 4; F.A.D. 1; NSA 1, 2. 

WEIBEL, Madeline Marie — Business; Bacon Road, Old West- 
bury, Long Island, New York; Social Activities Chairman, 
Dix 1; Floor Rep. 3; House Counselor 4; Booth Co-chairman 
Spring Spree, Simmons Hall 2. 

WILLIAMS, Carol Dorothy — Business; 231 Rockwell Street, 
Norwich, Connecticut; Junior Welcome 3; Business Manager 
MIC 4. 



TOPOR, Janice Gloria — Education; 23 James Street, New 
Bedford, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Secretary Sim- 
mons Hall 2; House Counselor 3; Student Assistant, Mesick 
Hall 4. 



WOLFF, Barbara Ellen — Education; 395 Riverside Drive, 
New York 25, New York; NSA Co-ordinator 3, 4; Simmons 
Hall Social Activities Chairman 3; Secretary-Treasurer Social 
Relations Club 2; Boston Area Co-ordinator of NSA 4. 



TORTO, Diane Josephine — Publication; 25 Cherry Street, 
Lynn, Massachusetts; Handbook editor 3; Newman Club 1, 2, 
3, 4; Spring Spree Co-chairman 2; House President, South 4; 
News 1. 



WYNER, Sandra Km— Education; 521 Clinton Road, Chest- 
nut Hill 67, Massachusetts; Campus Guide 2; Junior Welcome 
3; Chairman Pre-Prom Party 3; Chairman Simmons Hall 
Dance 2. 



TROMBLEY, Laurel B. — Home Economics; 29 Hemlock 
Drive, Milton, Massachusetts; Dorm Social Activities Chair- 
man 2; President Morse Hall 3; House Counselor 4; Campus 
Guide 2; Dean's List 2, 3. 

TRUST, Gail— Prince; 30 Westbourne Road, Concord, New 
Hampshire; French Club 1, 2; House Counselor 3; Assistant 
Fire Captain 2; Senior Rep. from Prince 4. 



YATES, Margaret Aileen — Home Economics; 24 East 219th 
Street, Euclid, Ohio; Campus Guide 2; Home Ec. Club 2, 
3, 4; Vice-president 4. 

ZIMMERMAN, Roberta Fay — Education; 41 Popular Avenue, 
Deal, New Jersey; Class Secretary 2; Dorm Vice-president 2; 
Campus Guide Chairman 3; Junior Welcome Steering 3; 
Stu-G Rep. 3; Second Vice-president of Stu-G 4. 



136 



PATRONS 



Dr. and Mrs. Charles B. Bailey 
Mrs. Anna Banks 
Mr. and Mrs. Abraham J. Block 
Mr. and Mrs. George L. Caneva 
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Conlin 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Cutler 
Mr. and Mrs. George R. Dunlop 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Fair 
Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Fairbairn 
Mr. and Mrs. William A. Gemelli 
Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Gravengaard 
Mr. and Mrs. William Greenbaum 
Dr. and Mrs. Jack Greenstein 
Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Guest, Jr. 
Dr. and Mrs. E. H. Harris 
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hodess 



Mr. and Mrs. Gad Jacobson 
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Knight 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Lowe 
Mr. and Mrs. Meton A. Mantell 
Mrs. Ralph Nash 

Dr. and Mrs. Donald A. Nickerson 
Mr. and Mrs. Max Nobel 
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Pritsker 
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Poole 
Mr. and Mrs. Harold Ranstad 
Mr. and Mrs. Raymond A. Rider 
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Sanders 
Mr. and Mrs. Isadore T. Shapiro 
Mr. and Mrs. Lincoln D. Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Taylor 
Mr. and Mrs. Philipp Wiebel 



137 



CApital 7-0310-0311 -0312 

SWAN, NEWTON & COMPANY 

Meats and Poultry, Frozen Fruits and Vegetables 
Butter, Cheese and Eggs 



2-8 Faneuil Hall Market 



Boston, Mass. 



Established in 1867 



DICKSON BROTHERS 

Kitchen Furnishings 
Hardware — Electric Appliances 

26 Brattle Street 
Cambridge 38, Massachusetts 



Keep in Touch with Simmons 
Through 

NEWS 

Subscription Rate 
$3.00 per year 



Compliments of 

STARLITE SHOP, INC. 

274 Brookline Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 
Tel. BEacon 2-7633 



DIEGES & CLUST 

MANUFACTURING JEWELERS 

226 Public St. Providence, R. I. 

RINGS PINS 

MEDALS CHARMS TROPHIES 



BOLTON SMART CO., INC. 

Wholesale Purveyors of Choice 

Beef — Lamb — Veal — Pork — Poultry 

Butter — Cheese — Eggs — Frosted Food 



19-25 SOUTH MARKET ST. 

Phone LAfayette 3-1900 



BOSTON, MASS. 



138 



Telephones 

CApitol 7-0708 

0709-0710 



SAMUEL HOLMES, INC 

Poultry and Game 

Boston's Premier Poultry House 

84 Clinton Street 

Boston 9, Mass. 



Schools, Hospitals 

Hotels, Restaurants 

Airlines 



Government Approved Plant U.S.D.A. No. 1525 



ROBERT ROLLINS BLAZERS, 




INC. 


821 Broadway 


New York 3, N. Y. 


Specialized Blazer Service 




to 


Schools 


Classes 


Colleges 


Athletic Teams 


Golf Clubs 


Award Committees 


Sororities 


Bands 


Fraternities 


Glee Clubs 


Honor Societies 


Choral Groups 








Famous for 
Good Foods 

Delicacies 

Perfumery 

S. S. PIERCE CO. 

Store at 133 Brookline Ave. 



WITH OUR SINCERE GOOD 
WISHES 
TO THE 

CLASS OF '62 
SIMMONS COLLEGE 



THE SHERATON-PLAZA 

BOSTON 



H. de F. NYBOE 

General Manager 



BARNABY, INC. 

Florists 

Say It With Flowers 

11 Harvard St. Brookline, Mass. 

Tel. LOngwood 6-5626 



139 



Compliments 
of 

Stu-G 



Compliments of 

ARTHUR ARMOND 
BEAUTY SALON 

266 Brookline Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 
Tel. BEacon 2-6236 



Compliments of 
of 

Pilgrim Road Store 

Arthur A. and Howard S. Johnson, 
19 Pilgrim Road 
Boston 15, Mass. 





THE 


SHOE DEN 




46 4th Street 


274 Brookline Avenue 




Chelsea 


Boston, Mass. 




TU 4-2399 


AS 7-3573 



Compliments of 




367 Boylston Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 



Compliments 
of the 

Simmons Cooperative Store 



Compliments of the 

LONGWOOD PHARMACY 

411 Brookline Ave. Boston, Mass. 

Phone LO 6-3333 

Prescription Specialists 
Five Pharmacists 



Medical Center Pharmacy 

of Boston 

319 Longwood Avenue 
(opposite Children's Hospital) 

Call Longwood 6-1414 
or Beacon 2-39 11 



140 




idea man . . . 

the Keller yearbook 

representative 




To the casual reader a yearbook is often simply an 
"album" of pictures with accompanying identi- 
fications and enough written text to fill up the re- 
maining holes on the pages. Merely ink on paper 
. . . though nice to own and enjoy. 

But to the staff and the adviser the yearbook 
means much more. For yearbook work comprises 
a multitude of details: Layout, Art, Photography, 
Copy, Typography, Covers and Binding (not to 
mention the small detail of money-raising). 
Highly technical and often confusing, these details 
are at the very least time-consuming and a source 
of anxiety to a staff unless the publisher's repre- 
sentative is company-trained to give needed help 
and suggestions. 

All representatives for Wm. J. Keller Inc. are 
skilled in the many facets of yearbook work, hav- 
ing at their finger-tips the answers to yearbook 
problems as well as a multitude of ideas for new 
graphic arts special effects, to enable the staff to 
produce a yearbook that is different and attractive. 
Your Keller salesman is more than a technical ad- 
viser, he is a "clearing-house" of yearbook ideas. 



ROSWELL FARNHAM 



^ 



Wm. J. Keller Inc. 

Publishers of Finer Yearbooks 
Buffalo 15, New York 




executive and sales offices 
located in the chrysler building 
405 lexington avenue, n. y. 17, n.y. 



s 

MEMBER 



'■A, OltiW 



official photographers to the 

1962 MICROCOSM 




specialists in fine photography throughout new england 



142 



be proud 

of the hotel where your family 
or friends stay when 
visiting Boston. 



suggest 



Internationally famous for 
Old Bostonian graciousness in 
modern comfort. All rooms with 
private bath, TV, radio. 



PRIVATELY OWNED AND OPERATED BY 
THE SHERRARD FAMILY 



Compliments of the 
Class of 1963 



Compliments of the 

LONGWOOD PHARMACY 

411 Brookline Ave., Boston, Mass. 
Phone LO 6-3333 

Prescription Specialists 
Five Pharmacists 



GILMAN DAIRY 

grAde 
Dairy Products 

23 Franklin St. Maiden, Mass. 

DAvenport 2-4706 



Compliments of 

ARTHUR ARMOND 
BEAUTY SALON 

266 Brookline Ave. 

Boston, Mass. 
Tel. BEacon 2-6236 



Compliments of the 
Class of 1964 



MIC 


wishes 


to thank 


the 


following for 


their 


help in 


writing 


the 


articles about 


their 


respective organizations: 


Elinor Lowe 






Laurie Taylor 


Cindy Crane 






Joan Conlin 






Ann Webster 





143 



LEARNING IS FOREVER 

AS YOU MOVE FROM THE MICROCOSM 

TO THE MACROCOSM 

TAKE YOUR REFERENCE SKILLS WITH YOU 

FOR YOUR CAREER 

FOR YOUR FAMILY LIFE 



The Encyclopedia AMERICANA 

The BOOK OF KNOWLEDGE 

The BOOK OF POPULAR SCIENCE 

LANDS AND PEOPLES 

GROLIER ENCYCLOPEDIA 

RICHARDS TOPICAL ENCYCLOPEDIA 



Best Wishes From 



GROLIER INCORPORATED 



575 Lexington Avenue 
New York 22, N. Y. 



144 



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